Our new series, ‘A Week in the Life’, will focus on industry insights from Cantabs as they intern in numerous sectors. Whatever your interests, whether it be engineering, public sector, finance, consultancy – we’ll have something for you. Make sure you stay updated either via Facebook or our mailing list.

Leon Culot
Herbert Smith Freehills


Hi, I’m Leon and I’m going into my third year of Law at Jesus College. A few weeks ago I finished a vacation scheme (lawyer lingo for a 2/3 week summer internship) at Herbert Smith Freehills, a commercial law firm headquartered in London with a focus on litigation and disputes. In the weeks prior I also did schemes at Taylor Wessing and Simmons & Simmons.

What does a typical day look like? 

I got into the office around 09:00 and finished around 18:00, apart from a few evenings where I stayed late to help with particular tasks – for one of the weeks I was there we were in court at a hearing so it was a busy time and all hands on deck! Tasks varied depending on which seat (department) you were in – I spent time in the general litigation group and the general commercial group so got involved with a mix of things. Tasks included commercial and legal research, writing case notes, attending meetings and (luckily for me) going to court. The graduate recruitment team also hosted whole group events explaining aspects of the firm, such as diversity and inclusion, as well as the work of the different departments. There were also several social events after work.

How did you hear about this internship? 

As a law student, I found myself inundated with information on vacation schemes and the firms that offer them, through events organised by the Law Society, as well as the Cambridge solicitor careers fair in October. I first learnt about HSF through a conversation with a trainee at this fair – if you want to learn more about the differences between law firms, I would definitely recommend going along and actually talking to the trainees, rather than just grabbing the free mugs and phone chargers (but still make sure to grab some merch afterwards!). HSF also ran a recruiting event in the form of a black-tie poker evening at the Cambridge Union, which instantly won me over. I learnt more about the scheme online, using websites such as Legal Cheek and Chambers Student.

Talk through the application process. What did you find difficult or perhaps surprising about it? 

The application process for vacation schemes is long and can appear daunting at first – it certainly put me off applying for schemes during my first year! But, once you know what to expect, the process is doable. It varies by firm but for HSF there was an online application and online reasoning test, followed by an assessment day in London with two interviews (one on yourself, one assessing your legal reasoning skills) and a group discussion exercise. Success here gets you onto the vacation scheme, which is essentially a 3-week interview for a training contract! The application for some firms can be difficult, with several questions demanding 500+ word answers, but HSF just had a single fairly general question of around 1000 words. The assessment day was surprising in that it focussed a lot more on the application of the law than other assessment days I had done, which tended to be more commercially-oriented. They did know I was a law student though, so the experience may be different for non-lawyers!

Did you need any particular skills for the placement? 

The skills needed for the placement are largely the same as those needed for your degree – an analytical mind, attention to detail and a positive attitude. You should also be able to manage your time well and not overburden yourself with work in an effort to show off. I would emphasise the importance of showing enthusiasm for the work of those you are shadowing or sitting with and asking genuine, insightful questions. Lawyers love talking about themselves and their work so this is a sure-fire way to get on the right side of the people who will be recommending you (or not) for a long-term position!

What was the highlight of your week/internship so far? 

My highlight was definitely spending four days in the High Court, sitting at the solicitor’s table with my colleagues and following along with the hearing. It was fascinating to watch the interplay between solicitor, barrister and judge and to see cross-examination of witnesses. Some legal trainees don’t experience a trial in 6 months sitting in a litigation seat so I was extremely fortunate to spend a whole week at trial out of only 3 spent at the firm! How many networking/socialising opportunities are there? HSF had fewer social events than other firms put on, but there were still ample opportunities to nab a few free glasses of champagne and some canapes! The main group social was pizza making but there were drinks evenings with trainees and partners, a summer party with future joiners and a nice meal with just the vacation scheme interns. HSF was good in that it provided a lot of opportunities to meet people at all levels of the firm, buddying you with several trainees to hear their perspective, as well as organising a partner drinks evening.

What have you learnt from your internship? 

The most important thing I have learnt is what a commercial solicitor actually does all day! As a law student, it can be hard to imagine the day-to-day tasks of a solicitor and they can seem far-detached from the academic work we do. Shadowing solicitors for several weeks and helping with their workloads shed a great deal of light on this. I also learnt a lot about working in a City office generally and I saw how much collaboration there is between the different departments of the firm. As I was commuting in London during the heatwave, I also learnt what the tube feels like when it’s 36ºC outside. The answer? Not pleasant.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector (or get a place on your internship)? 

Early on it’s important to do your research – research the areas of law you might be interested in and research firms that are strong in those areas. It’s important that you know a decent amount about a firm before writing an application for it and don’t just churn out identical application answers to different firms – they will notice! Having said that, once you’ve written one application you can reuse certain ideas or passages across multiple application forms. For interviews and assessment centres, be confident but not overbearing and amicable but not obsequious. Know your stuff and make interviews a conversation, particular by having some good questions ready to ask your interviewers at the end. In terms of experience, it is always useful to start early and wannabe solicitors should look into first-year schemes. However, the bulk of schemes are targeted at second years (or final year non-lawyers), so this is when you need to be on it. Good luck!

3rd year Law
Jesus

Shamil Shah (Treasurer)
DSAM Partners


I am currently interning at DSAM Partners, a primarily discretionary hedge fund, which has recently started using systematic techniques to test trading signals. I am based in the London office, working as a Quantitative Analyst. I’ve just finished my second year at Jesus College, studying Natural Sciences (Physics).

What does a typical day look like?
The day at a hedge fund starts early, before the European markets open – I arrive at work at about 7am. The first thing I do is compose an email to the Portfolio Management Team detailing key upcoming events for stocks in our portfolio, important since Earnings Season is well under way. After preparing breakfast from the well-stocked kitchen, I work on my main project. This involves programming in Python to back-test systematic trading rules on historical stock price data, analysing results, attempting to explain the patterns observed and suggesting strategies on how to use the trading rules to maximise returns. It helps to read relevant academic economic literature to understand the results I obtain. While I am primarily working on quantitative analysis, I have the opportunity here to experience other roles in the hedge fund. I attend fundamental analyst meetings, often involving an analyst from the sell side (investment banks such as JP Morgan and Goldman Sachs) summarising their evaluation of a stock or industry. I usually leave the office around 5:30pm.

How did you hear about this internship?
I actually heard about this internship a couple of years ago, from my school. DSAM were looking for further maths students to intern with them. The application process involved a CV screening and a mathematics and problem solving based interview. I have worked at DSAM for short periods over the past couple of summers, taking on trading and technical analysis projects, and am now back on a longer internship.

Do you need any particular skills for the placement?
Programming and mathematical skills are essential for working in quantitative analysis. While I had experience of coding in other languages (C++ and MATLAB, through the Natural Sciences course), I was able to pick up Python on the job, by reading existing code (and extensive use of Stack Overflow!). I am now comfortable coding in Python, giving me the independence to develop my own ideas. Good communication, both verbal and written, is important. I need to be able to effectively discuss my ideas with other analysts and concisely report my findings. Other soft skills are less important for quantitative analysts, but are useful for fundamental analysts who interact with analysts from the sell side and others from the world of business and finance.

What was the highlight of your week/internship so far?
Attending the Best Ideas Dinner, an event run by a large broker for young buy side and sell side peers to present ideas and enjoy a meal together, was definitely a highlight. As the only intern present at the event, it was a fantastic opportunity to network with people from investment banks and hedge funds throughout the capital. The dinner involved us each pitching an investment idea. Preparing the stock pitch was very different from my quantitative analysis work and was a great way to learn more about the process of fundamental analysis.

What have you learnt from your internship?
This has been a brilliant opportunity to develop my understanding of how the markets work, from a quantitative perspective. I have learnt the process that quantitative analysts and traders go through, from designing trading rules, to data cleaning and analysis. Important points I have taken away include how to avoid over-fitting data, a huge pitfall in this field. I have also learnt a new coding language, a skill that is extremely useful in this industry and many others.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector?
The ability to code is a prerequisite to working in quantitative analysis; learning a language would be extremely useful (Python and R are commonly used in this field). I also recommend giving Robert Carver’s book ‘Systematic Trading’ a read – it gives practical advice on how to trade effectively using quantitative techniques. Ask lots of questions to people in the industry; I am lucky enough to be surrounded by some extremely experienced people here, having previously worked in investment banks or other funds.

3rd year NatSci
Jesus

Ines Tan (Vice President)
Government Communications Service


Hi, I’m Ines and I’m interning with the Press Office at the Department for Transport for two months, under the wider Government Communications Service Internship Scheme. The Communications Service spans all central departments. There are several components, but all work to support government and minister’s priorities, enable the efficient and effective operation of public services and improve people’s lives. The work that communications encompasses is incredible. For example, if you remember the hedgehog THINK or five-a-day playdough people adverts we grew up with, the GCS were responsible for them.

What does a typical day look like?
I start work at 9am, but as I’m in press office, I’m expected to be in by 8:50 so I can cover phones as other press officers don’t come in till later in the day (we work in shifts). We usually have cuts at 9:30 and wash-up at 4:30. Cuts is where we run through key coverage/issues for the day, including any action taken by the duty press officer which needs to be flagged to the wider team. Wash-up is where press officers highlight things that the late shift, duty press officer and back up might need to know. They’ll forecast potential issues that could come up overnight and talk about pending items on the grid. The grid is the schedule by which all government announcements are made and needs to go through various stages and be approved by No. 10.
Press office handles media relations and unsurprisingly, news. A typical day for me would include answering calls from journalists regarding media enquiries (i.e. information for their stories) or interview bids with ministers. Other things I do include media coverage of recent government policy releases and monitoring relevant transport news stories. If we hear of particularly bad coverage or a bad news story, we need to draft lines and statements from the government to try and quell it immediately. There’s a fair amount of time spent knocking down bad stories.

How did you hear about the internship?
I received an email from the Careers Service about the opportunity. It’s an internship for applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds, much like the Summer Diversity Internship Programme for the Civil Service. Since I fit the requirements, I applied from there.

Talk through the application process. What did you find difficult or surprising about it?
The application process for the GCS internship was surprisingly easy. It involved filling out an application form, with the standard 250 words on the internship, some competency questions etc. and my CV. After this there was a “sifting stage”, and I was notified if I made it through to the telephone interview. The telephone interview lasted around half an hour. It involved some further competency-based questions and some knowledge about the Government Communications Service itself. I was told of the outcome of the interview two or three weeks after.

Did you need any particular skills for the placement?
Not really – in the press office, being able to write in a more “news” tone is definitely required but that comes with training and time. Typing fast is also a benefit since rapid emailing becomes commonplace very, very quickly. Other than that, be able to prioritise and multi-task and obviously communication is important. I talk to different people every day, whether it’s someone from The Times, a policy official or the press office in Dublin, so if I wasn’t comfortable being social, I definitely am now!

What has been the highlight of your internship so far?
The level of responsibility I’m given is honestly amazing; I’ve had so many highlights since I’ve started. I think the main one so far has been helping my line manager with the release of the Inclusive Transport Strategy which sets out how the government aims to make the transport system accessible for all by 2030. I actually got to issue the press notice to journalists announcing the launch! I also spent some time with the Digital Team and helped create graphics and tweet copies for the Department’s Twitter. Finally, I’ve been given complete ownership of a government announcement (which at the time of writing I can’t expand on)! This included writing the press release, creating the social media material and coordinating with external stakeholders and journalists. Seeing it from start to finish and having it be my own was unbelievable. More than that, it’s the fact that the work I do here and the work I help with literally changes lives across the country in real ways. I think the Civil Service is the only place where you can see that really happen.

How much networking/socialising opportunities are there?
There are loads! There are 54 GCS interns this year across the departments. At Transport, there are around six or seven of us and we meet up for lunch. However, because we’re all on different desks there isn’t really a core sort of intern group, it’s very ad hoc DIY. Professionally, we have a lot of shadowing opportunities and rotations so we can get some experience from other desks. My ‘buddy’ supplied by the GCS works in the Home Office and is trying to get me some time with them and the Department for Education, for example. Internally, I’ve had a rotation with digital, I’ll probably get some time with external affairs, marketing (in charge of campaigns like THINK!) and social media. The internship scheme also arranges really cool opportunities like a visit to the Houses of Parliament and Number 10 and learning skill-building courses.

What have you learnt from your internship?
Honestly? There’s a lot of news on transport. It’s everywhere.
Other than that, I’ve been given an insight into how government works and how things get done. It’s been really cool to see everything from an insider perspective. I can now write emails within twenty seconds probably and balance angsty journalists on one end and chase up policy officials on the other. I do a lot of chasing so I honestly have no issue making calls anymore.

What have you found surprising or unexpected?
The sheer breadth of experience you can get from working in the Civil Service. People on my desk have come from the Ministry of Defence, Education, Trade etc. Moreover, the different things you can do within communications is so interesting and the variety of stuff I get given even on one desk makes this experience so worthwhile.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector?
Definitely be aware of the structured opportunities the government run, like the GCS internship or the SDIP/EDIP. Other than that, the government is hard to get real experience of because security clearance is a nightmare. I would say if possible, maybe see if you can get some shadowing opportunities in local government, like with the town hall etc., and see where you can go from there!

3rd year History
St Catharine’s

Sebastian Burgess
Abbott Diabetes Care


I’m interning at Abbott Diabetes Care, a medical devices company in Witney, just outside Oxford. Within this, I’m in the Operations Engineering department. We are responsible for planning and executing upgrades and installation of the equipment and infrastructure that goes into making the company’s flagship products, such as Libre Freestyle and the blood glucose strips.

What does a typical day look like?
My day starts at 9am and finishes at 5.30pm. Hours are light, you’re scheduled for 37.5 hours a week. For most of theday I will be writing reports for upgrades we want to make to the manufacturing lines. The company is subject to extremely strict regulations to protect customers, so before we make any changes we must consider their potential impact to the product. This discussion will typically be informal at each other’s desks, although for bigger changes we might schedule a meeting with various company experts.

How did you hear about the internship?
Through the Uni weekly newsletter. I wanted to work in a big engineering company involved in the healthcare sector and Abbott fit the bill perfectly.

Talk through the application process. What did you find difficult or surprising about it?
The application was not strenuous, an hour-long phone call and I had an offer. The call itself was largely top-level topics including my qualifications and the job. I know other interns at Abbott though who had their interviews on site, which involved more rigorous technical assessments.

Did you need any particular skills for the placement?
Soft skills, like teamwork and communication, and specific technical knowledge are both required to work in this area, but the most useful skill is to remember everything you are told the first time. My way of doing this is to immediately write everything relevant down after a meeting or discussion with colleaguesof what was discussed and what needs doing. You integrate into the project much faster that way.

In terms of hard skills much of it is taught to you on the job, although the broader Engineering course at Cambridge has helped make me aware of the diverse engineering in the projects.

What was the highlight of your week/internship so far?
Presenting the results from a test method that I had independently developed at a company meeting. Present were various representatives from the Abbott hierarchy, so being given a stage to present my findings and the impact it had on the company was a real privilege.

How much networking/socialising opportunities are there?
The company is very large, and there’s so much going on outside of your department that you can miss a lot focusing on the one project. Thankfully, my line manager set up meetings for the interns with the heads of different departments. We discussed the work they do and what the future for Abbott is. As an intern thinking about going into this industry this was an invaluable opportunity.

What have you learnt from your internship?
This internship has given me the opportunity to hone my soft skills like being able to juggle multiple work streams. I’ve also gained a real appreciation for the differences in working in a big company, as opposed to a start-up. They both have their pros and cons. Bigger companies do tend to be held back by formalities and paperwork. The reward though is being able to be part of a much bigger player in the industry. Even in a big company, I get the impression that the work I’m doing is directly going towards improving people’s lives.

What have you found surprising or unexpected?
It was surprising how little of the actual content you spend hours learning at Uni comes into play at work. This can be a bit frustrating at first! The Cambridge course is useful though, in that it teaches you how to juggle a lot of work at once.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector?
In the engineering industry, you face the choice between working for a bigger company or a smaller company. Working in a big company can be very rewarding if you’re part of a team working on a large project (and can look very good on the CV too!). There are plenty of such companies around, and the support Cambridge provides helps for the strict formulaic interviewing procedure they tend to have.

There are also plenty of smaller companies in the Cambridge Science Park for instance. If you’re thinking about the relative contribution you can make to the company, at a smaller company, this contribution will probably be larger. When you get to your next interview and you’re asked a question like: ‘Can you give an example of when you [insert stereotypical work scenario here]’, the more the company gives you the opportunity to contribute, the more likely you are to have a cracking answer to this question.

3rd year Engineer
Trinity Hall

Pippa Stevens (President)
British Antarctic Survey


Hi, I am on a six week research placement at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) in the Air, Ice and Climate team. I am trying to understand how and why the width of the tropics is related to the age of air in the stratosphere; this is important to help us understand global warming.

What does a typical day look like?

The hours are pretty flexible, but I generally work a 9am – 5pm day. Most of my day is spent writing code, running trials and manipulating data sets. There are around ten summer students currently working at BAS, and the variety of research between us is incredible: from analysing the diets of wandering albatross using chemical traces in their feathers, to modelling Jupiter’s ionsphere! Aside from individual work, I have a lot of interaction with my supervisor, and several seminars are given throughout the week.

How did you hear about this placement?

I found out about work at BAS through a friend who worked here last summer. If environmental science isn’t your scene, there are many fascinating ‘UROP’ (Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme) placements available every year, which span the sciences. However, in science, often the best way to find opportunities is often to simply email the group leaders in the area you are interested in (most email addresses are on faculty websites!) and go along and chat to them.

What have you learnt from your internship?

I have learnt a huge amount about atmospheric science, and am now far better at coding in Matlab! It is easy to learn about scientific areas outside your speciality, as everyone is very willing to share their experiences; I have been lucky to have had a tour of the BAS aquarium, fossil collection and and ice core laboratory (at -25 degrees). A word of warning: don’t get too swamped by coding and huge data sets, always ask for help if you’re struggling, and always have an end goal in mind.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector (or get a place on your internship)?

Valuable research experience is easily available in most areas of science, especially in Cambridge and if you are willing to work for free; in most cases, your college will be able to give you funding for living costs/accommodation if the work is related to your degree. Even if research isn’t your dream career, a science placement will teach you valuable data analysis skills, and a huge amount of knowledge that will help you in your degree. All that is required is a bit of research, a keen email and one informal chat/interview with a supervisor!

3rd year NatSci
Jesus

Imogen Sinclair (Past Vice President)
McKinsey & Company


I’m interning at McKinsey & Company, a large management consulting firm based in central London. The placement gives penultimate year students the chance to do exactly what you’d do on the first year of the job as a business analyst, just for the summer. Interns get staffed onto a project and join the team of consultants in assisting clients in a variety of different ways.

What does a typical day look like?

A typical day for me involves: meeting my teammates in the morning at breakfast in the McKinsey office; heading over to the client office in London; doing a team check in to set out tasks for the day; starting on our tasks; talking to the clients and each other regularly, especially if anyone has any issues or things to think through; having a team lunch; having a team problem solving; having a meeting with the client; doing some more individual work; doing a team check out to confirm what we’ve done and need to do; and heading home or meeting up with friends for dinner in the city. But between the interns, there’s no typical day! Every project is really different from each other, and some interns aren’t based in London – of fourteen of us, only half are, with interns off in Rome, Munich, Paris, Dublin, Luxembourg and Sicily. The variety of experience is huge.

How did you hear about this internship?

At the start of second year, I realised I wanted to do consulting, and McKinsey was pretty hard to miss. As one of the Big Three, on any career website for consulting it came up, and I also knew a couple of people who had applied/worked there, so I gave it a shot.

Talk through the application process. What did you find difficult or perhaps surprising about it?

I really enjoyed the application process. It was pretty rigorous, starting with a problem solving test sat in London (after passing the CV screening), then two rounds of interviews, the first with two and the second with three interviews. But it was very accessible – before the first round of interviews, they invited us all down for a case study workshop in their London office, and I had an interview ‘buddy’ from the firm who rang me to do a practice case with me as well as answer any questions. These both definitely surprised me, as I felt like the company wanted me to succeed. The interviews were all around case studies, so it required a lot of case study prep, but the experience was very positive for me.

Did you need any particular skills for the placement?

No hard skills, just soft ones like communication, sharp analysis, ability to problem solve, and being able to work in teams. Any degree background is totally fine: we have a few historians, some economists, some scientists, and nobody has any real advantage in terms of experience from their studies.

What was the highlight of your week/internship so far?

As I write this, I’m on my way back from a company retreat for the interns and their business analyst ‘buddies’ in the firm – a definite highlight. They took us to a hotel in Devon, and it was a weekend of unlimited eating, drinking, relaxing, and various fun activities.

How much networking/socialising opportunities are there?

We’ve had tonnes of social activities, with drinks every Friday, various dinners, a BBQ, lots of football events, and of course the weekend away. All of them allow the interns to socialise with each other and also with people who have worked there longer. The quantity of free food is slightly terrifying – people like to joke about the ‘McKinsey stone’, due to the free breakfasts and lunches in the office and constant team meals, as well as free drinks.

What have you learnt from your internship? 

In a few weeks, I’ve learnt a lot about soft skills, in terms of how to harness them and develop them further. I’ve also learnt some harder skills, such as on excel. And a lot of it is also just understanding consulting and McKinsey better.

What have you found surprising or unexpected?

I’ve been surprised how social it’s been, with constant activities going on. I’ve also been surprised how quickly you become part of the team, even just being there for the summer and being brand new – I’ve still been trusted with significant work of my own to do, and feel like I’m contributing.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector? 

A lot rests on the interview process, so prep hard on case studies, as well as thinking about personal experience examples for competency questions. Practicing with friends is really helpful. Beyond that, you just have to apply to internships and be yourself.

3rd year History
Emmanuel

Solene Peroy (Vice President)
BNP Paribas, Trading


Hi, I’m Solene and I’m currently interning in trading at BNP Paribas in London. My first rotation is in FXLM options trading, which means that my desk trades options (a type of financial product) on currencies in emerging markets, such as the Turkish lira and South African rand.

What does a typical day look like? 

I’ll typically get in at 7am if I need to listen to the morning call, which is a daily meeting giving everyone on the trading floor an overview of important news, and what to expect for the coming day. As an intern, I can’t execute trades because I haven’t sat any certifying exams, but I shadow my team for a couple of hours and help my manager by working on a project analysing important data in Excel. My team typically has lunch at the desk but also leaves when the relevant markets close, which for my desk is 5pm!

How did you hear about this internship? 

I heard about the BNP Paribas summer internship at the Finance careers fair at the start of Michaelmas term, and then at an event held by the bank in Cambridge.

Talk through the application process. What did you find difficult or perhaps surprising about it? 

The most challenging part of the application process was for me the assessment centre, which consisted of written tests, Trading and Sales games, and an interview. The Trading games were fast-paced and put us on the spot quite a bit, but it was also a very good experience to simulate the environment of a trading floor. What mattered in the application process was not so much our financial knowledge but rather our attitude, and our ability to pick up concepts quickly enough to play the games.

Did you need any particular skills for the placement?

I think very valuable skills as an intern are the ability to present yourself with confidence but not arrogance, and to ask questions you actually want answers to. From a technical point of view, for my desk in particular, having a hand at Excel is very useful, although in general this may be learnt on the job.

What was the highlight of your week/internship so far?

The highlight of my internship so far has probably been the weekly Wednesday breakfast organised by the bank with a different speaker each time. The speakers are in general very senior employees and having the opportunity to ask them questions in such an environment is a really valuable one.

How much networking/socialising opportunities are there? 

In the training week, there are plenty of socialising opportunities as one of the aims is for the interns to get to know each other and the graduate class already working at the bank. Further on in the internship, there are fewer organised events but as the interns get closer and we get to know our teams there is usually something on after work every Friday if not several times a week.

What have you learnt from your internship?

Coming from a Natural Sciences background, I have learnt a great deal not only about financial mechanisms but also some economics – I feel like I already read the news in a different way. Another learning process is also how to prioritise tasks during the day, for instance balancing spending time on your project at your own desk versus shadowing other desks in order to get a broader view of the bank.

What have you found surprising or unexpected? 

I did not know that the role of an intern would be different to the role of a graduate in that no intern can execute trades or talk to a client (without the required certification), but at the same time this gives us a huge opportunity to learn by observation, talk to people in many different parts of the bank and ask questions without having the same responsibility as a full-time employee.

What advice would you give to someone else looking to gain experience in this sector? 

Advice that I would pass on to someone applying for an internship in Global Markets is to be prepared to learn about the finance industry before, and at every step of, the joining process. I would definitely recommend researching the industry and talking to representatives of the banks you would like to apply to, but it is also impossible to know a great deal before starting a placement – presenting yourself in the best light and showing that you are eager and able to learn more will be most effective in interviews and beyond.

3rd year NatSci
Jesus